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Collection
The Hockaday Museum of Art

 

The Hockaday Museum of Art's collection captures the nostalgia and grandeur of Glacier National Park, the glory days of the Empire Builder Railroad, the Blackfeet Nation, and those who chose to settle in this majestic part of Montana.  The collection features works by significant authors, photographers, and painters as well as Glacier Park collectibles such as vintage maps and hand-tinted photographs. 

Artists include: Charles M. Russell, Winold Reiss, Ralph Earl DeCamp, Joe Scheurle, Fred Kiser, Leonard Lopp, T.J. Hileman, Roland Reed, John Clarke, O. C. Seltzer, Mark Ogle, Nicholas Oberling, John Fery, Adolph Heinze, Earl E. Heikke, and Diccon Swan.  Also featured are artifacts from writer James Willard Schultz and other luminaries.

The Hockaday Museum continues to build its permanent collection in achieving its mission to preserve the artistic legacy of Montana and Glacier National Park.

R. E. DeCamp - Storm on St. Mary's Lake

Storm on St. Mary's Lake (1911)
R. E. DeCamp
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

R. E. DeCamp
1858-1934

Ralph Earl DeCamp was born in Attica, New York. He grew up in Minnesota, by the Red River. He ran a threshing business, but also made a name for himself as an artist in the Midwest. Charles Fee, a high-ranking executive for the Northern Pacific Railroad, asked the painter to join this corps of artists working on the Northern Pacific's behalf, and the young artist accepted. DeCamp found himself bound for Yellowstone National Park in early summer 1885. In Helena he began working for the United States Surveyor General's Office until 1924.

Charles M. Russell and DeCamp became lifelong friends. Russell admired his mastery as a landscape painter, one time remarking, "that boy can sure paint the wettest water of anybody I know. You can hear his rivers ripple." After nearly fifty years as a mainstay of Montana art, DeCamp's life in Helena came to a halt when his wife Margaret passed away unexpectedly in November 1934. He moved to Chicago and died there two years later.

John Fery - Elk on Lake McDonald

Elk on Lake McDonald
John Fery
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

John Fery
1859-1934

Johann Nepomuk Levy was born in Strasswalchen, Austria on March 25, 1859 and grew up in Pressburg. His father urged him to study art and literature, and in 1881, he enrolled at the Vienna Academy of Art. Upon moving to Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1883, Johann legally changed his name to John Fery in order to better adapt to his new country. He returned to Europe where he married Mary Rose Kraemer. After their first child was born in 1885, he went back to Milwaukee with his family. The following years found Fery leaving his wife and children for extended periods to paint in the West. Recognition came slowly, but his work finally caught the attention of Louis Hill of the Great Northern Railway.

Hill immediately hired him for the "See America First" campaign. From 1910 through 1913, Fery was on the payroll of the Great Northern. He completed an amazing 347 major oil paintings. They decorated Glacier National Park lodges, ticket agent offices, and Great Northern depots from St. Paul to Seattle. Always prolific, he averaged nearly 14 outdoor scenes each month. In 1914 he was "loaned" to the Northern Pacific Railway to paint scenes of Yellowstone National Park. He returned to Glacier to complete paintings for the opening of Many Glacier Hotel. He spent the next few years free-lancing throughout the West, before moving back to Milwaukee in 1923. In 1925, Louis Hill again called on Fery. The contract required Fery to produce four to six large canvases monthly. He spent the next four summers painting in Glacier. In 1929, the Ferys moved to Orcas Island, Washington to be closer to their children. A new studio was built, but a fire destroyed all the paintings he had finished for the Great Northern.

Adolph Heinze - Mount Gould and Lake Josephine

Mount Gould and Lake Josephine
Adolph Heinze
Oil on Canvas

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection
with thanks to all contributors to the Hockaday Museum's Art Acquisition Fund 2008

Adolph Heinze
1887-1958

Chicago-born painter Adolf Heinze was commissioned by the Great Northern Railway to create images of Glacier park for brochures and posters.

He was also the only artist, except for Winold Reiss, to illustrate the Great Northern Railway's famous calendars in 1929.

Heinze studied with Karl Beuhr and William Merritt Chase. He was a member of the All-Illinois Fine Artists Association, Chicago Palette and Sculptors, and Chicago Gallery Association, where he exhibited in 1927.

While working for Louis W. Hill's See America First Campaign, he came west to experience the grandeur for himself. He was photographed on the high ridges of Glacier National Park painting his natural subjects, and his paintings graced many a brochure and guide -- especially featuring the fabulous Red Busses and new Prince of Wales Hotel above Canada's Waterton Lake.

Heinze also traveled to the Grand Tetons, and painted for other National Parks, although he spent most of career in the American Midwest.

T. J. Hileman - Two Guns White Calf

Two Guns White Calf
T. J. Hileman
Photo

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

T. J. Hileman
1882-1945

T. J. Hileman was closely associated with Glacier National Park. For many years he produced and sold countless photographs from his commercial shop. Not only did he capture impressive scenic images, but he documented the visits of important individuals to the area, his work was reproduced on countless postcards and in brochures, periodicals and books. Tomar Jacob Hileman was born on November 6, 1882 in Marienville, Pennsylvania. He graduated from the Effingham School of Photography in Chicago. In 1911, moved to Kalispell, Montana and opened his own portrait studio. He met Alice Georgeson, and in 1913 they were ... the first couple to have been married in Glacier Park." Hileman began his association with the Great Northern shortly after arriving in Montana, moving his bulky camera equipment by packhorse, often perched precariously on narrow ledges to capture just the right moment on film. In 1926, Hileman opened photo-finishing labs in Glacier Park Lodge and Many Glacier Hotel. Tourists appreciated being able to drop off film in the evening and pick up their prints the next morning. On March 13, 1945 Tomar Hileman died at his home on Flathead Lake. In 1985, the Glacier Natural History Association purchased over one thousand of Hileman's nitrate negatives. The Association also owns 32 of Hileman's photographic albums containing more than 2000 prints. These treasures remain a lasting tribute to Glacier's most prolific photographer.

Fred H. Kiser - Self Portrait

Selt Portrait
Fred H. Kiser
Photo

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

Fred H. Kiser
1878-1955

Fred H. Kiser is acknowledged as one of the most successful commercial photographers between the turn of the century and the First World War. Born in Grand Island, Nebraska, Kiser moved to Portland, Oregon where his parents ran the Columbia Beach Hotel and Nursery. Fred became interested in photography, and with his brother Oscar, established "Kiser Brothers, Photographers." A 1903 exhibition of his Crater Lake photographs brought Kiser his first public recognition. Two years later he was honored as the official photographer of the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exhibition in Portland, Oregon.

That same year, Louis Hill became president of the Great Northern Railway and began searching for artwork to promote Glacier.

Hill discovered the Kiser exhibition and immediately appreciated Kiser's striking photographs of mountain scenery. Kiser was hired as the official photographer of the Great Northern Railway, and for six years spent his summers in Glacier. Soon, his images were reproduced in brochures, books, periodicals, and as postcards. Some were released in beautiful hand-colored portfolios richly showing scenes from Glacier.

After Kiser's association with the Great Northern ended, he returned to photographing Crater Lake. There, he built his studio in 1921, and became it's official photographer.

Leonard Lopp - View from the Lopp Studio Lodge Flathead Lake

View from the Lopp Studio Lodge Flathead Lake
Leonard Lopp
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

Leonard Lopp
1888-1974

Harry Leonard Lopp was born May 1, 1888, near Highmore, South Dakota. Lopp was raised on a cattle ranch and attended nearby Canton and Elk Point schools where he showed early signs of artistic talent by drawing everything around him. Later he studied art under Prof. P.J. Rennings at Union College, Lincoln, Nebraska, and privately with Prof. John Updyke and Robert Wood. On July 1, 1918, he was married to Margaret Booth of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Together they painted and traveled over much of the U.S., Canada and Alaska. During much of the '20's Lopp was staff artist for the Hudson's Bay Company of Canada and exhibited from Winnipeg to Vancouver.

Contracts with the Elks and Moose Lodges took them north to Alaska for several summers. In 1928 they established art studios and a home for his parents at Seaside and Portland, Oregon. The depression forced the closing of the galleries and a move to Great Falls, Montana in 1936. Lopp was later appointed staff artist for the Glacier National Park Company, exhibiting every summer at Many Glacier Hotel until 1941 and again in 1960. National art recognition was achieved in 1941 when Lopp was invited to New York for the one-man show at the Milch Gallery and a concurrent showing at the Metropolitan. During their two-month stay in New York, they were the guests of geologist and glacier specialist Dr. and Mrs. Jim Dyson of Yale University with whom the Lopps had spent many days hiking on the trails in Glacier Park. In 1944, Lopp designed and built his own lodge on the west shore of Flathead Lake. He handpicked every log in the chalet from standing timber. This home became a center for the arts and a favorite stopping place for their many friends and fellow artists such as Roland Gissing of Canada, Red Skelton, and Dave Rubinoff, a musician.  Additional shows followed at the Pressmen's club in Spokane in 1951, and he won the Premier Award, Fine Arts Department, of the Montana State Fair at Great Falls in 1961. Major commissions were from former President Harry S. Truman; FBI Chief J. Edgar Hoover; the Lions International President; the restoration of several C.M. Russell paintings in Great Falls; and collections for the Conrad National Bank of Kalispell and the Bank of Idaho at Boise. Failing health and age forced a move to Kalispell where he passed away in 1974. His passion for the beauty of Glacier Park and his ability to record it on canvas has secured a permanent position as one of the great artists of Montana and the West.

Ace Powell - Three Wise Guys

Three Wise Guys
Ace Powell
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

Ace Powell
1912-1978

Born Asa Lynn Powell on April 3, 1912, in Tularosa, New Mexico. He spent his boyhood in Apgar Village, inside Glacier National Park. When 21 years old, Powell worked on the Bar-X6 Ranch on Duck Lake out of Babb, Montana. It was there, at the edge of the Great Plains, managing more than a 1000 head of horses for Glacier National Park concessions, that Powell's works began to leap forward. The Hockaday's collection of Ace Powell works includes the paintings "Three Wise Guys" and "Winner Take All," numerous etchings of western life, and several bronze and wood sculptures.

The Ace of Diamonds
A decidedly large influence in Powell development as a young artist was the Montana legend Charles Marion Russell, the cowboy artist who summered on the shores of Lake McDonald inside Glacier Park. At age ten Powell copied one of Russell's paintings down to the famous trademark signature, the buffalo skull. Joe De Yong, Russell's protégé saw the copy and was impressed, except that he suggested the young Powell have his own 'brand' -- Powell's Ace of Diamonds trademark signature was born.

Ace Powell - Ace of Diamonds

Winold Reiss - Eagle Child, Mountain Chief, and Bear Medicine

Eagle Child, Mountain Chief, and Bear Medicine
Winold Reiss
Pastel and Watercolor

Long-term loan from The C.M. Russell Museum

Winold Reiss
1888-1953

Born near Munich, Germany, Winold's father,enrolled him at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the School of Applied Arts. Winold fell in love with a fellow student, Henrietta Luethy, and they married in 1912. Reiss convinced his bride that they should come to America. When they arrived in New York the following year, settling in New York City. By 1918 he had saved enough money to allow him to chase his dreams of the West in real Indian country. In the fall of 1919, he traveled alone to Browning, Montana on the Great Northern. He stayed at the Haggerty Hotel and produced 35 portraits within the month, using brilliant colors in pastel and tempera, rather than traditional oil. The Blackfeet bestowed on him the name Beaver Child.  Back in New York, he exhibited his new works, and they caught the eye of Dr. Philip Cole who purchased the entire group.

Reiss' brother Hans traveled to Glacier National Park and decided to stay and became a licensed guide in the Park. By chance, one of his clients was Louis Hill. Their association led to a contract for Winold Reiss.  For ten years beginning in 1927, Winold Reiss returned to Browning every summer to paint for the Great Northern Railway. Many exhibitions followed, in America and overseas. Reiss left an incredible body of work behind him that captured the true spirit of the Blackfeet. Reiss was also commissioned by the Great Northern Railroad to promote its route into Glacier Park during its advertising heyday from 1920s to the 1950s. The Great Northern Railway reproduced Reiss’ work on calendars, postcards, menus, playing cards and more. His work illustrated the Railroad’s “See America First” campaign that promoted travel to the “Crown of the Continent.” Finished portraits were sent from Browning to the Great Northern Railway headquarters in St. Paul. For three years he also ran a summer art school with his friend Carl Link, renting a cabin from Hugh and Mary Black near St. Mary's Lake.

C.M. Russell - Young Boy

Young Boy
C.M. Russell
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

Charles Marion Russell
1864-1926

Charles M. Russell was born in St. Louis in 1864 and by sixteen was living the life of a cowboy in Montana Territory. Russell first gained prominence with an image capturing the severe winter of 1886 when thousands of cattle perished on the northern plain. Waiting for a Chinook became one of his most important artistic statements. This exquisite little watercolor was shown all around Helena and soon became famous throughout the Territory. His days as a wrangler ended when Nancy Cooper became his bride in 1896. Nancy was Russell's business manager, freeing him to concentrate on his art. Russell's success gave him the means to build a new home and studio in Great Falls. He and Nancy began spending some of their summers in Glacier. In 1906 they built the Bull Head Lodge after Charlie's buffalo skull trademark. The cabin was accessible only by boat and was located 100 feet from the water's edge, and became one of the stopovers for dudes led through the Park. Russell's charm provided great entertainment for the tourists. Nancy -- regarding each one as a potential client for future paintings and bronzes -- made certain everyone signed the guest book. He began displaying his work in the third-story lobby of the newly-built Lewis Hotel at the northern end of Lake McDonald. In 1926, one of the most destructive fires in the history of Glacier swept through the Park. A mile of forest burned along the edge of Lake McDonald but stopped short of Bull Head Lodge where Russell was spending his last summer. On October 24, Charlie Russell died of a heart attack at his home in Great Falls.

Joe Scheurele - Wolf Eagle

Wolf Eagle
Joe Scheurele
Lithograph 1913

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

Joe Scheurele
1873-1948

Scheuerle's family migrated to the United States from Vienna, Austria in 1882. He attended public schools in the old German section of Cincinnati, took lessons at the Cincinnati Art Academy, and taught at Ohio Military Institute and other regional schools, before he took a steady commercial job at Cincinnati's famous Strobridge Lithographing Company, which printed hundreds of full-color posters for Barnum & Bailey, Adam Forepaugh, The Ringling Brothers, and Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Scheuerle put his drawing talents to work on the colorful animals and performers featured in these traveling shows, doing sketches from life for eventual printing. His work was literally pasted throughout the United States. Scheuerle met William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody in Chicago when he went to work for another printing company. He also made friends with other performers in the Wild West Show - especially Iron Tail of the Sioux. He later traveled to the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota to spend time and paint him in his home country. (Iron Tail later died on a train, while working for Buffalo Bill.) Joe visited with the Native Americans regularly with his wife Carolyn and daughter Margaret until he was sixty-five years old. He sketched the outstanding Sioux general Red Cloud, and many other survivors of the Indian wars of the late Nineteenth Century. When Glacier National Park was chartered by Congress in 1910, Scheuerle was visiting the Blackfeet, and met Charles M. Russell. They struck up a long friendship. Joe also worked for Louis W. Hill, drawing the Mountain Goat logo for the Great Northern Railway, and producing some of the commercial art for Hill's See America First campaign. Joe Scheuerle's social circle included artists J. H. Sharp and Joe DeYong, William S. Hart, the movie actor, and Will Rogers, cowboy-turned-Broadway-star.

At his homes in Chicago or New Jersey, he made all of his acquaintances welcome. He hosted Many Coups of the Crow Nation, and even took him to the Lincoln Park Zoo.

O. C. Seltzer - Young Boy
Young Boy
O. C. Seltzer
Oil

Hockaday Museum Permanent Collection

O. C. Seltzer
1877-1957

Olaf Seltzer was born in Copenhagen, Denmark. When he was twelve, his exceptional artistic talent opened the doors of the Technical Institute of Copenhagen to him.

He moved to Great Falls, Montana after his father's death. He became a railway and locomotive repairman for the Great Northern Railway, and met Charles Russell, who encouraged him to paint. Seltzer practiced his painting on the side, while working for the railroad. He started making artwork full time in 1921.

He visited New York in 1926 - 27, going to museums and galleries and meeting eastern buyers. His style shows some of Russell's influence, but that can be said of almost every other western painter after Fredrick Remington.

In 1930 he was commissioned by Dr. Philip Cole to paint a series of miniatures on Montana history that all but cost him his eyesight. He returned to Montana to stay in 1936.

 

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